Meet More of Your Ancestor In Original Records

I need to apologize to my 4th great-grandmother in advance – sorry 4th Great-Grandma Staats, but thank you for the record I use in this example. 

This particular example is brought to you by the fabulous record-keeping of the Quakers, but the lesson applies to any records that we use in genealogy. Always, always, always seek out the original record, or at least as close to the original as you can get. You never know what you are going to find until you look. Or, as J.R.R. Tolkien said much more eloquently than I, “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.”

Anyone who has done Quaker research is probably familiar with William Wade Hinshaw’s spectacular, multi-volume  abstractions of Quaker Monthly Meeting minutes – and they are spectacular. From my experience, while most everyone has used this resource, it’s a resource that provides enough information that most people don’t ever pursue those original meeting minutes. Pursue those original meeting minutes. Here follows a perfect example of why we need to do this. First, here is the Hinshaw entry in which Margaret (Chandler) Staats is disowned from the Redstone MM (near Brownsville, PA):

William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. IV: Ohio Monthly Meetings (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. 1944), 80; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com accessed: 31 Jan 2009).

William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. IV: Ohio Monthly Meetings (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. 1944), 80; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 31 Jan 2009).

 

The original Monthly Meeting records in the case are not accessible, but early transcriptions of the original are held at the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania (or at least were at the time of filming). They have been filmed and are available though any FamilySearch family history center. When I consulted the original record, this is what I discovered:

Redstone Monthly Meeting, Brownsville, Pennsylvania, Minutes of the Men's and Women's meetings, 1793-1862., "Margaret Staats, formerly Chandler" disownment (1800); Redstone Monthly Meeting (Brownsville, Pennsylvania), citing typescript records at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; FHL microfilm 382,817.

Redstone Monthly Meeting, Brownsville, Pennsylvania, Minutes of the Men’s and Women’s meetings, 1793-1862., “Margaret Staats, formerly Chandler” disownment (1800); Redstone Monthly Meeting (Brownsville, Pennsylvania), citing typescript records at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; FHL microfilm 382,817.

 

Which of these records, in the process of reassembling your ancestor’s lives, gives you a better picture of them as people? People with real lives and real problems. People who made mistakes. People who had the strength of character to overcome. People who helped make you who you are today. Always, always, always look for the original records. Their stories are there, waiting to be told. I just hope Grandma Staats doesn’t get mad at me for telling this part of hers. But you know what, it’s yet another example of a strong woman in my family standing up to adversity. Thirty-eight years later, her daughter, Edith (also my ancestor) fought an even tougher fight as a single, nineteen year-old mother with an out-of-wedlock child, and Margaret would take the stand in her daughter’s defense. (see “‘Because I Know He Is’: Edith Staats vs. Jesse Pickering, 1838

How can I not be proud that these people are my ancestors? Rock on, Margaret and Edith, rock on.

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One Response to Meet More of Your Ancestor In Original Records

  1. avatar Karen Ewers McHugh says:

    Amazing story of a wonderful genealogical find. Thanks very much Chris. I shall certainly be going back and looking at as many original records as I can. Great tip. Oh, and I agree with you about your female ancestors. They do indeed rock!

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