Corbit v. Corbit: Oh, the Family Stories Court Records Tell

While looking for case law to sort out an entirely different issue related to recording of deeds, I came across this fascinating story.1 It did nothing to help me in my particular dilemma, but illustrates what an underutilized source court reporters really are. I have no relation to this family, but can only imagine how excited I would be if I did, to add this to my family story.

It’s the story of Robert Corbit, born about 1790. Robert had accumulated quite a large real and personal estate.  He executed three deeds in 1871, at the age of 81, in which he divides his property between three sons, George, Adam, and James. The problem is that he had eleven living children at the time, and had long professed his desire that his children share and share alike after his decease. What happened?

You’ll have to read the court decision to know the answers. I call it a court decision, but that’s not really doing it justice– it’s a piece of prose. It’s a really, really well-written piece of prose. It may be a stupendous example, but even if it were less-well written, it is still a really good reminder of the sort of information we might be able to find about our own ancestors when we dig into these court reporters. The best part: many are available free to search and download on Google Books!

Do read the case. It’s fabulous. And then try to find your own family story in court reporters. Happy hunting!

  1. Corbit v. Corbit, 7 Ohio Dec. Reprint 692 (1879). []
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